22. Oktober 2018 „Israel – die ersten 70 Jahre“ Univ. Prof. (em.) Rolf Steininger (Universität Innsbruck)

   

Univ. Prof. (em.) Dr. Rolf Steininger, Studium der Geschichte und Anglistik in Marburg, Göttingen, München, Lancaster und Cardiff , 1971 Promotion und 1976 Habilitation an der Universität Hannover, dort bis 1983 Professor; von 1984 bis zur Emeritierung 2010 Leiter des Instituts für Zeitgeschichte der Universität Innsbruck, seit 2008 auch an der Freien Universität Bozen; seit 1989 Senior Fellow des Eisenhower Center for American History der University of New Orleans, seit 1995 Jean Monnet- Professor; Gastprofessuren in Tel AvivQueensland (Australien) und New Orleans, Gastwissenschaftler in Ho Chi Minh-Stadt (Saigon), Hanoi und Kapstadt; 2011 Tiroler Landespreis für Wissenschaft; zahlreiche Veröffentlichungen und preisgekrönte Hörfunk-, Film- und Fernsehdokumentationen zur Zeitgeschichte; mehr Informationen unter www.rolfsteininger.at

17. Mai 2018 “Tumbling Thoughts – Dealing with the Shoah as a Memory in Israel” Prof. Moshe Zimmermann (The Hebrew University of Jerusalem)
„Gedankliche Stolpersteine – Der Umgang mit der Shoah als Erinnerung in Israel“

   

Prof. Moshe Zimmermann was born in Jerusalem in 1943 and studied history and philosophy there. After gaining his doctorate on the Emancipation of the Jews in Hamburg in the 19th century, Zimmermann worked at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem on setting up an Institute of German History. The Richard Koebner Institute of German History was founded in 1980; Prof. Zimmermann has been its director since 1986. The central topics of his work are the history of the German Jews and German-Jewish relations.  Prof. Zimmermann also worked at the University of Giessen: at the Collaborative Research Centre (SFB) on Cultural Memories. Researchers from twelve disciplines of cultural studies examined the content and forms of cultural memories in their plurality, constructiveness and dynamics – from Antiquity until the 21st century.

27. November 2017 „Turning Points in Israeli History: From the Balfour Declaration to the Camp David Accords“. Prof. Itamar Rabinovich (chair), Prof. Shlomo Ben-Ami, Prof. Ilan Troen

Amb. Prof. Itamar Rabinovich is founding President of the Israel Institute, a Distinguished Global Professor at New York University, and Non-Resident Distinguished Senior Fellow at the Brookings Center for Middle East Policy. He is Professor Emeritus of Middle Eastern History at Tel Aviv University and the University’s former President. Ambassador Rabinovich has been a member of the faculty of Tel Aviv University since 1971 and served as Chair of the Department of Middle Eastern Studies, Director of the Dayan Center for Middle Eastern and African Studies, Dean of the Humanities, and Rector. From 1992-1996, he was Israel’s Ambassador to the United States and chief negotiator with Syria. Ambassador Rabinovich’s most recent books are The Lingering Conflict: Israel, The Arabs and the Middle East (2011) and The View from Damascus (2009). He is a member of the American Philosophical Society, a foreign member of the American Academy of Arts and Science and a member of the Trilateral Commission. He earned a B.A. from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, an M.A. from Tel Aviv University and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles.

Prof. Shlomo Ben-Ami graduated from Tel Aviv University and St Antony’s College, Oxford. From the 1970s onwards he was a historian at Tel Aviv University, serving as head of the School of History from 1982 to 1986. 1999 he was appointed Minister of Internal Security and in addition in 2000 Foreign Minister. In 2002 he resigned from the Knesset. In 2006- 2010 Prof. Ben Ami served in the board of the International Crisis Group. He is now a member of the Crisis Group Senior Advisers. In 2009-2010 he was a member board of the Commission for Nuclear Non proliferation co-sponsored by the governments of Australia and Japan. Ben-Ami is currently Vice-President of the Toledo International Centre for Peace. His latest book is “Scars of War, Wounds of Peace: The Israeli–Arab Tragedy” (published in Oxford, 2006)

Prof. Ilan Troen was born in Boston, educated at Brandeis, the Hebrew University in Jerusalem and the University of Chicago. Before moving to Israel​ in 1975 when he joined Ben-Gurion University, he was on the faculty of Missouri and Princeton. At the Ben-Gurion University he was the Lopin Professor of Modern History; Dean of the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences; Director of the Ben-Gurion Research Institute and Archives in Sede Boker; and Director of the Kreitman Foundation Fellowships. At Ben-Gurion University he contributed to pioneering programs in Israel Studies and was the founding Editor of Israel Studies. He established the Schusterman Center for Israel Studies.  He has authored or edited numerous books in American, Jewish and Israeli history.
He is co-author of the following publications: “Jews and Muslims in the Arab World; Haunted by Pasts Real and Imagined” Rowman and Littlefield, 2007; “Imagining Zion: Dreams, Designs, and Realities in a Century of Jewish Settlement” Yale University Press, 2003; “Divergent Jewish Cultures: America and Israel” Yale University Press, 2001.

12. November 2017 “In Conversation with Meir Shalev” moderator: Ute Woltron (Der Standard)

   


Meir Shalev, geboren 1948 in Nahalal in der Jesreel-Ebene, studierte Psychologie und arbeitete viele Jahre als Journalist, Radio- und Fernsehmoderator. Er ist einer der bekanntesten und beliebtesten israelischen Romanciers und erhielt 2006 den Brenner Prize, die höchste literarische Auszeichnung in Israel. Zuletzt erschien sein Roman ›Zwei Bärinnen‹. Meir Shalev schreibt regelmäßig Kolumnen für die Tageszeitung ›Yedioth Ahronoth‹. Er lebt in Nord-Israel.

 

 

2. Dezember 2015 “David Ben Gurion” Prof. Anita Shapira (Tel Aviv University)

   

Prof. Anita Shapira the former Ruben Merenfeld Professor in the Study of Zionism at Tel Aviv University, former dean of the faculty of Humanities at Tel Aviv University and head of the Rabin Center. She served in many public bodies, such as the Council for higher education, the claims conference, and also was the president of the Memorial foundation of Jewish culture. Shapira specializes in modern and contemporary Jewish history, especially in social and cultural history and questions of identity. She taught at the University of Pennsylvania, Columbia and the Maximilian University in Munich. She published numerous books and articles on the history of Zionism, the Jewish community in Palestine and the state of Israel. Her best-known works are “Berl Katznelson: a Biography of a Socialist Zionist” (CUP), “Land and Power, the Zionist Resort to Force, 1882-1948”(OUP and Stanford UP), „Yigal Allon: Native Son“ (Pennsylvania UP), „Yosef Hayyim Brenner, A Life Story“ (Stanford UP). Her comprehensive book „Israel: A History“ (Brandeis UP), won the National Jewish Book Award in 2012. Recently she published “Ben Gurion: The Founder of Modern Israel” (Yale UP). She won many prizes and awards. In 2008 she was awarded the Israel Prize in history.

12. Oktober 2015 “Israel and the New (Dis) order in the Middle East” Amb. Prof. Itamar Rabinovich (New York University, Tel Aviv University)

 

Amb. Prof. Itamar Rabinovich is founding President of the Israel Institute, a Distinguished Global Professor at New York University, and Non-Resident Distinguished Senior Fellow at the Brookings Center for Middle East Policy. He is Professor Emeritus of Middle Eastern History at Tel Aviv University and the University’s former President. Ambassador Rabinovich has been a member of the faculty of Tel Aviv University since 1971 and served as Chair of the Department of Middle Eastern Studies, Director of the Dayan Center for Middle Eastern and African Studies, Dean of the Humanities, and Rector. From 1992-1996, he was Israel’s Ambassador to the United States and chief negotiator with Syria. Ambassador Rabinovich’s most recent books are The Lingering Conflict: Israel, The Arabs and the Middle East (2011) and The View from Damascus (2009). He is a member of the American Philosophical Society, a foreign member of the American Academy of Arts and Science and a member of the Trilateral Commission. He earned a B.A. from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, an M.A. from Tel Aviv University and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles.